How do you guys use food? Do you use it as self-medication — a response to emotional output? Is food

How do you guys use food? Do you use it as self-medication — a response to emotional output? Is food simply part of going through the motions of a typical multi-meal plan day? Do you view it as (sometimes the best part of!) a required social obligation? I mean, yes, right? Duh. All of those things. A better question is maybe: What do you want it to do for you? There’s a handful of functional medicine practitioners and similar researchers who’ve completely changed how I think about food (and supplements, exercise, sleep, stress management because, of course, it all goes together) and what I want the mechanisms triggered by lifestyle choices to do for my strength in mind and body. One of those super cool docs, most recently on Rogan, @peterattiamd, whose work I first became interested in when he was on @timferriss show in 2014 (ep. 50 + 65), bases his practice on the science impacting longevity. He’s a proponent of prolonged and intermittent fasting, time-restricted feeding and other fasting-mimicking processes. Sidenote: Attia is also the only person to swim from Maui to Lanai and back again in one day.  I’ve been a time-restricted feeder in the 8-10 hour window since I stopped nursing two years ago. Clearly, I’m no authority on the science — according to @foundmyfitness and one of her mentors and leader in the TRF field Dr. Sachin Panda, they have waves to go to conclude research on human studies, but the stuff they’re finding in mice is CRAY— but I can speak to the dramatic boost in energy levels I’ve experienced (No more crashes at 3pm ) I don’t get hangry anymore, and I’m no longer dependent on the immediacy of food. Aka: if I’m not in a position to eat something healthy, I can chill a few hours until I’m home while acting human the whole time. A feat previously unheard of. Implementing TRF has also curbed my fast-carb craving. It took a few weeks of discipline in the beginning for me to physically and mentally adjust (What new habit doesn’t?), but I liken the results to unicorn magic, and unless science tells me it’s not such a brilliant idea, TRF and the occasional long fasts are forever penciled into my life plan. 🦄

How do you guys use food? Do you use it as self-medication — a response to emotional output? Is food simply part of going through the motions of a typical multi-meal plan day? Do you view it as (sometimes the best part of!) a required social obligation? I mean, yes, right? Duh. All of those things. A better question is maybe: What do you want it to do for you? There’s a handful of functional medicine practitioners and similar researchers who’ve completely changed how I think about food (and supplements, exercise, sleep, stress management because, of course, it all goes together) and what I want the mechanisms triggered by lifestyle choices to do for my strength in mind and body. One of those super cool docs, most recently on Rogan, @peterattiamd, whose work I first became interested in when he was on @timferriss show in 2014 (ep. 50 + 65), bases his practice on the science impacting longevity. He’s a proponent of prolonged and intermittent fasting, time-restricted feeding and other fasting-mimicking processes. Sidenote: Attia is also the only person to swim from Maui to Lanai and back again in one day. #illhavewhatheshaving I’ve been a time-restricted feeder in the 8-10 hour window since I stopped nursing two years ago. Clearly, I’m no authority on the science — according to @foundmyfitness and one of her mentors and leader in the TRF field Dr. Sachin Panda, they have waves to go to conclude research on human studies, but the stuff they’re finding in mice is CRAY— but I can speak to the dramatic boost in energy levels I’ve experienced (No more crashes at 3pm ) I don’t get hangry anymore, and I’m no longer dependent on the immediacy of food. Aka: if I’m not in a position to eat something healthy, I can chill a few hours until I’m home while acting human the whole time. A feat previously unheard of. Implementing TRF has also curbed my fast-carb craving. It took a few weeks of discipline in the beginning for me to physically and mentally adjust (What new habit doesn’t?), but I liken the results to unicorn magic, and unless science tells me it’s not such a brilliant idea, TRF and the occasional long fasts are forever penciled into my life plan. 🦄

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