Three years ago around this time, I was meticulously penning baby shower ‘thank you’ cards and sweating over nursery furniture

Three years ago around this time, I was meticulously penning baby shower ‘thank you’ cards and sweating over nursery furniture manuals written in Danish. All but consumed with perfecting a registry of products recommended to me by “the experts” and the expert of experts: Mommy Bloggers. 🙄 (Sheesh, I would love a peek behind these paid partnerships with baby brands.) Aside from breastfeeding, I had truly put zero thought into how or what I would be feeding my future child. (Ironic how I thought a birth plan — of all things — was within the realm of my control 🤔) Fast-forward two and a half years, and I’m surprised at how integral the role of nutrition has come to play in my family’s household. How I choose to nourish myself and my kid can truly make or break our days. I’m at home with Graeme upwards of 90 percent of the week, and I’ll surmise to say that the grocery store-meal prep-cooking-feeding roller coaster has been (and maybe will forever be) enlightening and an experiment. But here’s what I’ve learned ... ______ As often as I can avoid it, I try not to feed my kid “kid’s food.” This notion of kids having separate menus, meals, foods they have to unwrap from a package or squeeze from a tube was developed half a century ago by Big Food to sell more stuff. The majority of these foods are processed and refined, and often full of sugar. It was a long time before I fully realized the massive commercial effort to be a ploy — it was one that had convinced me I was depriving my child if I didn’t buy him Spider-Man Go-Gurt and “organic strawberry milk“ (don’t be fooled by products wearing “organic” ... still check the label!) We’re fortunate to live in a city that offers a variety of kids classes and play spaces, but weirdly in my experience not much of a selection when it comes to nutritious lunch options. (Some of these places don’t allow you to bring your own food, which is like I get it you’re a cafe and kids have allergies, but also that’s not that cool.)  Low-fat milk leaves out the protein and often vitamin D whole milk offers growing kids and replaces it with sugar for taste. Animal crackers taste like cardboard and offer a similar nutrition profile 🦓

Three years ago around this time, I was meticulously penning baby shower ‘thank you’ cards and sweating over nursery furniture manuals written in Danish. All but consumed with perfecting a registry of products recommended to me by “the experts” and the expert of experts: Mommy Bloggers. 🙄 (Sheesh, I would love a peek behind these paid partnerships with baby brands.) Aside from breastfeeding, I had truly put zero thought into how or what I would be feeding my future child. (Ironic how I thought a birth plan — of all things — was within the realm of my control 🤔) Fast-forward two and a half years, and I’m surprised at how integral the role of nutrition has come to play in my family’s household. How I choose to nourish myself and my kid can truly make or break our days. I’m at home with Graeme upwards of 90 percent of the week, and I’ll surmise to say that the grocery store-meal prep-cooking-feeding roller coaster has been (and maybe will forever be) enlightening and an experiment. But here’s what I’ve learned … ______ As often as I can avoid it, I try not to feed my kid “kid’s food.” This notion of kids having separate menus, meals, foods they have to unwrap from a package or squeeze from a tube was developed half a century ago by Big Food to sell more stuff. The majority of these foods are processed and refined, and often full of sugar. It was a long time before I fully realized the massive commercial effort to be a ploy — it was one that had convinced me I was depriving my child if I didn’t buy him Spider-Man Go-Gurt and “organic strawberry milk“ (don’t be fooled by products wearing “organic” … still check the label!) We’re fortunate to live in a city that offers a variety of kids classes and play spaces, but weirdly in my experience not much of a selection when it comes to nutritious lunch options. (Some of these places don’t allow you to bring your own food, which is like I get it you’re a cafe and kids have allergies, but also that’s not that cool.) Low-fat milk leaves out the protein and often vitamin D whole milk offers growing kids and replaces it with sugar for taste. Animal crackers taste like cardboard and offer a similar nutrition profile 🦓

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