We eat a lot of red, fatty meat in our house. It’s all thanks to Joe — I’m pretty sure

We eat a lot of red, fatty meat in our house. It’s all thanks to Joe — I’m pretty sure he and his brother have been grilling since they were allowed to be within the proximity of an open flame. — I have only come around to the idea of eating a lot of nutrient-dense meat in the past 3 years, or starting right around my third trimester. Actually through the majority of my teens and mid-twenties my shopping lists were composed largely of lean meats, vegetables, fruits, and anything wearing (the now mysterious) “whole grain” label. For roughly two decades of my life, I swore by that old diet adage ... I thought eating light and lean would make me so. _____ I’m a few chapters into @bigfatsurprise  and Teicholz’s research is confirming positive changes I’ve seen in my recent health, mainly in the form of rising above mental and physical fatigue. According to Teicholz’s findings, the Mesai of Africa, a group of people known to have exceptionally low numbers affected by heart disease and coronary issues, would eat the fattiest portions of the wild game they killed and throw the leaner cuts, including the tenderloin, to the dogs  Biomarkers of diabetes, obesity and cancer — diseases that plague us today — was virtually nonexistent among this group. Sure, there’s obviously a lot more that goes into this (still reading), but for me, I know if I eat a meal like the ️ pictured, I’m solid for almost 6 hours. Additionally, red meat is chalk-full of vitamin B12 and zinc, which helps regulate immune system and make red blood cells. Basically, it can help guard from sickness and minimize fatigue (among a host of other benefits.) 🥩 _____ Full disclosure about the omegas: @amazon changed supplement delivery to two weeks into the future, so will have to revisit this idea anywhere from Jan 5-28 🤷🏻‍♀️ _____ Food: @slagelfamilyfarm coffee stout brisket + @sietefoods grain-free tortilla + onion

We eat a lot of red, fatty meat in our house. It’s all thanks to Joe — I’m pretty sure he and his brother have been grilling since they were allowed to be within the proximity of an open flame. — I have only come around to the idea of eating a lot of nutrient-dense meat in the past 3 years, or starting right around my third trimester. Actually through the majority of my teens and mid-twenties my shopping lists were composed largely of lean meats, vegetables, fruits, and anything wearing (the now mysterious) “whole grain” label. For roughly two decades of my life, I swore by that old diet adage … I thought eating light and lean would make me so. _____ I’m a few chapters into @bigfatsurprise and Teicholz’s research is confirming positive changes I’ve seen in my recent health, mainly in the form of rising above mental and physical fatigue. According to Teicholz’s findings, the Mesai of Africa, a group of people known to have exceptionally low numbers affected by heart disease and coronary issues, would eat the fattiest portions of the wild game they killed and throw the leaner cuts, including the tenderloin, to the dogs Biomarkers of diabetes, obesity and cancer — diseases that plague us today — was virtually nonexistent among this group. Sure, there’s obviously a lot more that goes into this (still reading), but for me, I know if I eat a meal like the ️ pictured, I’m solid for almost 6 hours. Additionally, red meat is chalk-full of vitamin B12 and zinc, which helps regulate immune system and make red blood cells. Basically, it can help guard from sickness and minimize fatigue (among a host of other benefits.) 🥩 _____ Full disclosure about the omegas: @amazon changed supplement delivery to two weeks into the future, so will have to revisit this idea anywhere from Jan 5-28 🤷🏻‍♀️ _____ Food: @slagelfamilyfarm coffee stout brisket + @sietefoods grain-free tortilla + onion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *